Candidate Interviews

We greatly appreciated the candidates in the Moncton election who took their time to meet with us to share their thoughts and views on some of the priorities we consider important for the new city council. To see a list of the candidates that accepted our invitation to participate, go here.

We would also like to thank the two mayoral candidates, George Leblanc and Pierre Michaud, for their participation in the Public Debate, which took place on April 23, 2008. For the list of organizations who supported this debate, go here.

Our goal has been to get as much information as possible to citizens before they vote.

We hope the answers from the candidates will help you.

Interview Questions

The interview questions were divided into four areas as follows. To go to the candidate responses, click a question or just scroll down.

Democracy

Question 1. Why are you interested in becoming a candidate for city council?

Question 2. Can you tell us your top five priorities for this election?

Question 3. Are you prepared to publicly disclose, before the election, the names of donors who contributed more than $100 to your campaign?

Question 4. How do you think the city council should change its decision making process to enhance openness and transparency?

Infrastructure

Question 5. Are you for or against using Public/Private Partnerships to provide services to the City of Moncton?

Question 6. Do you agree that the City of Moncton should award contracts to local developers to keep money in our economy and support local business?

Question 7. If elected, would you agree that the City needs to develop a Purchasing and Procurement Policy of Buy Local, Buy Canadian?

Question 8. What is your position on building a casino in Moncton?

Environment

Question 9. If elected, how do you propose to improve our public transit system in order to make it more reliable, convenient and accessible?

Question 10. What do you see as the key components of an energy conservation policy for the City of Moncton?

Question 11. If elected, what would be your position on the protection and enhancement of green spaces and parks (#e.g., Mapleton Park, Riverfront Park, etc.)?

Question 12. If elected, would you support a ban of cosmetic pesticides?

Question 13. If elected, would you support a ban on uranium exploration and mining in the Turtle Creek watershed and surrounding areas?

Question 14. What is your position on the replacement of the causeway with a bridge?

Social Welfare

Question 15. In order to promote and coordinate social development in the City of Moncton, are you prepared, if elected, to create a Human Development Council with strong citizen representation?

Question 16. Do you agree with a policy stating that all individuals and companies applying for a contract with the City of Moncton show proof that they pay a living wage of at least $10.00 to all their employees? (An individual working full-time all year would need an hourly wage of $10 to remain above the poverty line.)

Question 17. If elected, are you prepared to implement a Pay Equity policy for all city and contractual employees?

Question 18. How would you encourage the building of more modest housing stock, integrated in different neighborhoods, so as to avoid high and low income ghettos?

Question 1

Ward

Candidate

1.  Why are you interested in becoming a candidate for city council?

At large

Anya Trites

I have a lot to offer. In the North End it is hard to open a business. There are a lot of restrictions. Old bylaws need to be changed.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

I am interested and concerned about the community, and you have to be involved if you want change.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

I was brought up in a family atmosphere that attached importance to making a contribution. (My father was the first Harvard graduate in Canadian Studies.) He worked for fishermen and unions. My mother worked to help the needy with Father Barriault. I’ve often volunteered with the poor. Father Anselme was my uncle.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

I am a community activist and am a currently member of the following organizations: the East End Boys and Girls Club, the boxing commission, the Lions Club, the Metro Moncton slow pitch league. Formerly, I was also a member of the Multicultural Association of the Greater Moncton Area (MAGMA).

Ward 1

Paulette Thériault

I’m already working as lead on a number of projects (e.g. the Art Park at Aberdeen) and I’m involved in my neighbourhood (e.g. in Sunny Brae, a standing committee with a mission and a set of objectives). I would like to see five or six committees responsible for the city’s infrastructures and resources getting together and consulting citizens, and publishing municipal information.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

After 10 years, I want to continue the work that I have already begun with and for the community.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

I’ve been active in Moncton for a number of years. My motivation is that I feel City Council should become more youthful. New ideas must be introduced. We have to speak with young people. I’m interested in urbanization. Young people need us to make room for them. For example, it should be possible to walk and bicycle everywhere.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

I see many groups that are neglected in the community, for example, the disabled, like my mother, and young people. I want to give everyone in the community more presence at city hall.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

I have been involved in the community for over 8 years now, including time spent working in Harrison-Trimble and the school district. I want to keep serving my community.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

I have always been involved in volunteer and public work since I became student president when I was 17. I have also been a school board member and continue to volunteer. Becoming a councillor would just be a continuation of this volunteer work, in this case serving the population of Moncton. I have positive ideas and a vision that I want to deliver on.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

I have been interested and involved in municipal election campaigns since the early 60s, but it was only after I retired from CN Rail last January that I felt I had the time to serve as a councillor. When I watch the council meetings on Monday night TV, the decisions seem to have already been made. I want to find out what’s going on.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

I have been part of Moncton all my life. I raised my children here. I have worked with the schools, the theatre, the hospitals, and Headstart.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

If you want political change, you have to get involved. Commonly held values like social justice will never be a part of municipal politics until enough people get off the sidelines and drive for change.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

I have been there before, like it, and realize what can be done. I got started with the water privatization issue.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

City Council has lost its initiative and concern for citizens, especially in Ward 4. Parks have gone without attention for 30 years; sidewalks are not being cleared.

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Question 2

Ward

Candidate

2. Can you tell us your top five priorities for this election?

At large

Anya Trites

1. More green spaces and Mapleton needs to be better taken care of.

2. More government services oriented towards the outskirts of the city.

3. Public access to where the money is going (transparency).

4. Environment. We need to make better eco-choices for our kids.

5. Parks, kids, and pets.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

1. Accountability and fiscal responsibility.

2. Environment. I have been on the environment committee for the past 10 years, and have been working to reduce pesticide use.

3. Support for downtown businesses and the riverfront.

4. Implement recreation master plans covering parks, playgrounds, and transportation.

5. Support for heritage and cultural projects.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

1. Increase public participation; we need to be transparent. This is an issue even at the international level. It can be done using modern technology such as Facebook and websites. The primary means of communication might very well become the web.    

2. Emphasize infrastructure maintenance (underground, Coliseum, buildings).         

3. Achieve a healthy management of fiscal, environmental and human resources.    

4. Increased partnering between the city and the provincial and federal governments.

5. Maintaining a climate that allows us to preserve our quality of life.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

1. We need to block uranium mining both around Moncton and in NB.

2. Parkland protection.

3. Street improvements.

4. Police. We are paying for services that we aren’t getting. Sometimes police officers are borrowed to go to other communities, but we still continue to pay for them.

5. Handicap access.

Ward 1

Paulette Thériault

1. Reviewing the areas around schools: there’s a nude bar next to one high school, and an industrial site near another.   

2. Public transit

3. Taxes: Lobbying the provincial government for a reduction in taxes for people on fixed incomes.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

1. Giving power to the citizens. More citizen participation

2. Balancing environmental and social aspects with economic development

3. Communication with the citizens

4. More fiscal transparency

5. Protection of our watershed against mining

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

1. Young people – make a place for them 

2. The Petitcodiac River

3. Urbanization

4. Development of St. George St. (Downtown needs to develop)

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

1. Infrastructure, transit, roads.

2. Reviving community and encouraging participation

3. Social welfare, a living wage for everyone

4. Environment

5. Making our voices heard at all levels of government

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

1. Spending is out of control in the city

2. Reducing the tax rate (we should be able to reduce taxes because we have more revenue from a growing population)

3. Sidewalk plowing and street maintenance

4. Open and transparent government

5. Expanding Codiac Transit

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

1. Limiting property tax increases to the inflation rate. This might mean finding alternative sources of revenue such as a hotel tax.

2. More democracy at city hall, including a bylaw that required public meetings not only on zonings but on most decisions.

3. Eight wards instead of four so that everyone makes all their votes count.

4. Improved community services. For example, there is no community centre in the Northwest.

5. Transportation is also a priority.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

1. Policing, including the number of police officers and the sharing of costs with Dieppe and Riverview. (Why do we pay 75% of the cost?)

2. Watershed protection. We can’t have prospecting crews drilling for uranium in our watershed.

3. Services to outlying areas. For example, areas around George Road have no water and sewage connection.

4. Accessibility to councillors.

5. Property taxes. McKenna is right. Something must be done about taxes. We need to stop raising rates.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

1. Property tax issues

2. More openness and professionalism in the way we do business

3. The impact of fast growth on our green spaces and transit system

4. Resolution of the downtown story (casino, convention centre, etc.)

5. How we spend our money

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

1. Poverty and housing

2. Upgrades to water treatment

3. Environment-friendly policies

4. Parkland protection

5. More accountability for choices made at City Hall

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

1. A more sustainable environment

2. More trees

3. More walkways through subdivisions

4. More transparency

5. Lobby for changes to the Municipalities Act

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

1. Accountability.

2. Transparency. We need more awareness of where money is going.

3. Taxation. The municipal budget has been growing continuously due to the rising assessments. Why can we not have the same rates as our sister communities?

4. Community, especially in Ward 4. We need younger families in Ward 4.

5. Financial management. Two points. Budget planning should start earlier in the year. And the city budget is increasing too rapidly.

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Question 3

Ward

Candidate

3.  Are you prepared to publicly disclose, before the election, the names of donors who contributed more than $100 to your campaign?

At large

Anya Trites

Yes.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

Yes, I don't solicit donations.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

Yes, in accordance with provincial law. I am receiving money from my family, but it costs $10 000 to $12 000 for an “at large” campaign. But there are limits on how much you can spend.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

I refuse donations.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

Yes.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

I am in favour if it is required by law. In that case I am completely in favour.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Yes, but I would say contributions more than $250 or even $500.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Yes!

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

Yes. It should be any money, not just $100.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

Sure. My campaign is costing about $5000 out of my pocket.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

Yes. Certainly. But I don't have any big-spending donors.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

Yes.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Yes certainly, though like many candidates not affiliated with a political party I am self-funded and so far have received contributions only from family members.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

Yes.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

Yes, absolutely. All the money in my campaign is my own. I am not getting support from businesses or political parties.

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Question 4

Ward

Candidate

4. How do you think the city council should change its decision making process to enhance openness and transparency?

At large

Anya Trites

We need more openness and transparency at all levels of government.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

It is pretty much all on the website, but confidentiality must be respected. The budget is open to all. Sometimes it may appear that all members of the Council supported an issue, when that is not the case. Councillors votes should be published.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

Transparency is often confused with the possibility of disclosing information (a question linked to the commercial negotiation process; i.e., contracts cannot be disclosed).

Ward 1

Graham Walker

Council should work to create an open decision-making process. One step would be to publish a newspaper with their agenda.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

Council should be more open.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

Changes have already been made and now all committee meetings are open to the public unless there is a question of confidentiality as prescribed by law.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Yes for more transparency. We cut off Fleet Street to make room for a building. The decision was made behind closed doors.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

There need to be community meetings and everything should be done in public so as to encourage citizen involvement.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

Openness and transparency are already provided for in the Municipalities Act. In fact, a lot of issues that are discussed in private sessions could be handled in public.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

I would make it a bylaw that when 200 people sign a petition a public forum is held before any decision is made.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

Here is a complex issue that needs to be resolved, but certainly openness and transparency are important.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

Almost all business of the Council should be public except for private and personal issues.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

All council business should be public except in the rare cases where protection of privacy is an issue. A disproportionate amount of city business is now done behind closed doors.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

There are already policies on transparency and openness and these _are_ followed, but they need to be publicized.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

All meetings should be promoted. In addition, the limit (below which expenses do not need to be posted on the website) should be eliminated.

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Question 5

Ward

Candidate

5. Are you for or against using Public/Private Partnerships to provide services to the City of Moncton?

At large

Anya Trites

In general, I am against them. It may depend on what it is. I do support local business.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

Local government should be responsible for most services, but there are exceptions. For example, the 3P contract for the present Water Treatment Plant is good.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

To date I have not seen any need to consider PPPs for infrastructures, (including water).  I’m not ready to say no, because we have to look at it case by case.   

Ward 1

Graham Walker

Basically I am opposed to P3s. They are a way of selling off our future rights.

Ward 1

Paulette Thériault

The one for water seems to be working, so you have to take it one by one. I don’t have a real answer, but I’m open. There’s always a balance to be kept.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

The same goes for sewers, parks, and roads. I am against using P3s for any important service.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Hard to say. What’s important is to improve services. For some projects, it might work, and not for others.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

P3s have their place, but so does public entrepreneurship. Public entrepreneurship is needed to manage public resources to the fullest. In general, public services should be kept public.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

If it has a benefit for the city, I would be for it; however, the only way it can be cheaper is if they have a technology of their own. I worked on the Fourplex and the water, and would consider that they could have been done cheaper if kept public.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

Sometimes P3s are the right answer, so it depends. There have been successful cases, such as Evergreen School.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

I am against P3s. They lead to imprudent decisions and lack of coordination. For example, the new stadium at UdeM does not have enough parking.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

You have to look at them case by case. Evergreen would never have been built with public money.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Like many who were involved in the water fight, I am against P3s. Public utilities should be in the public domain to ensure that they, first and foremost, serve public interests. It is a fight worth fighting.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

Against.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

It all depends on cost. It is just like a mortgage. If it costs 3 times as much and you have the money, there is no sense paying for it over 20 years.

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Question 6

Ward

Candidate

6. Do you agree that the City of Moncton should award contracts to local developers to keep money in our economy and support local business?

At large

Anya Trites

Yes, mostly.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

Even if they are more expensive to use, there should be a policy in place to support local businesses within limits.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

No, because we are in an environment where we have to offer services at the best possible price. Local companies must either become more efficient or not charge too much.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

Yes, I am in favour.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

I would prioritize local business when we have the resources. But there has to be a balance.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

If it were possible I would like to do this, but there are laws against it.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

If the local business can offer a service for less, I would agree.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Absolutely. Contracts should be kept as close to home as possible.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

I don’t agree. We need to do everything we can to encourage our contractors to compete. In addition, if we do it, then Halifax and other cities will do it also, and our local contractors will wind up losing business opportunities.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

I am all for this but am unsure of the legal implications.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

I am for using local developers, but sometimes they have been known to do sloppy work. If their work is not up to standard, they should be moved to the bottom of the list on future projects.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

You need to get the best value for money. In addition, though I agree in principle, the local economy extends beyond Moncton. I believe in open borders for the Maritimes.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Certainly. For all business local tendering should be done first. Only if local skills are not available should we go outside, always with a view not only to bring these skills in but also to keep them here.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

This was a policy, but was changed. We need to change it back. I’m for local entrepreneurs.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

I do support local business; however, there are legal ramifications. I work in the contracting business, so I know that according to the Municipalities Act, the city has to choose the lowest bidder if the quality is the same.

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Question 7

Ward

Candidate

7. If elected, would you agree that the City needs to develop a Purchasing and Procurement Policy of Buy Local, Buy Canadian?

At large

Anya Trites

Yes.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

Yes, I am in favour of this.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

I am not in disagreement with this. In NS, Wolfville has a policy of not buying products from certains countries.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

Yes.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

Yes, and I would like more emphasis on organic agriculture et community gardens.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

Yes, if such a policy is legal.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Yes, that would encourage local business.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Yes.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

In purchasing the principle is equal service for equal cost. Hence, more important than buying local is promoting fairness by being open and transparent to all contractors.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

Yes.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

Yes.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

Again, so long as you can get value for money, it is best to support local people.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Yes.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

We should buy local as much as possible. I’m for fair trade rather than free trade.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

Yes.

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Question 8

Ward

Candidate

8. What is your position on building a casino in Moncton?

At large

Anya Trites

Everything has to be analyzed. We need to know what kind of impact it will have on small businesses when we take the VLTs out of bars?

At large

Kathryn Barnes

I don’t support a casino. I believe there is too much negative impact. They increase social cost while taking money out of the greater community.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

The resolution passed by the city said : “We wish to be considered as a site, but not for a standalone casino, and not in the downtown area.” The impact on addictions bothers me, but the only thing for the municipality to do is get the best deal possible.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

I am opposed. There are a lot of pitfalls to gambling. Too many in the community are addicted to gambling. The casino will have a mostly negative effect. It will make no profit for the community, but will result in added policing costs.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

I am not at ease with gambling. The city needs to take on more responsibility.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

I am not in favour of a casino unless the public really wants it.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

I disagree with a casino. We worry about a casino and a congress centre, but we forget about the young. I am opposed, but if we are going to have on, let’s get it downtown. However, there are more important things to worry about.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

I am personally fond of casinos, but would a casino really meet the needs of our citizens? Certainly we wouldn’t want one in the downtown area and the casino issue must be approached with caution.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

I have always been against it. I need to be shown the economic benefits versus the social cost. I think the casino only makes sense if it is a small part of a large destination gaming centre.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

Destination gambling can bring economic benefits to a city. However, it can also bring more crime so some increase in police services may be needed. One of the big advantages is that VLTs will be excluded from the surrounding area.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

My union represents 1000 casino workers in Windsor. Gambling can bring economic benefits; however, it also brings problems such as addiction, crime, prostitution, and drugs. One advantage of having a casino is that all of the VLTs will be taken out of the bars, and the casino can be placed in a relatively isolated location.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

I am ambivalent on this one. I don't know enough about it. It would depend on where it was located.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Destination gambling is a fallacy. You need only look to Sydney to see what a detrimental effect a casino can have. Casinos create a much larger problem than VLTs and they do not boost tourism.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

I am against it.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

I do not condone gambling; however, the casino is a provincial issue.

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Question 9

Ward

Candidate

9.  If elected, how do you propose to improve our public transit system in order to make it more reliable, convenient and accessible?

At large

 

Anya Trites

 

The transit system needs to be more accessible.

 

At large

 

Kathryn Barnes

 

This Council has already done many improvements. We are trying new routes even though they don’t always work. We continue to lobby the provincial government for more money for local transit.

 

At large

 

Pierre Boudreau

 

Codiac Transit is the best in Atlantic Canada in terms of deficit/millions of passengers/year. We have great new buses and are going to buy more. “Rapid transit” has been introduced. Efforts are being made to improve the bus routes. It is important to maintain the transit system and improve it.

 

Ward 1

 

Graham Walker

 

I would zero in on new potential bus routes. We need buses that are as fuel-efficient as possible and accessible for children and wheelchairs. We need to shorten routes so that the trip goes faster.

 

Ward 1

 

Paulette Theriault

 

I would encourage public transit by offering the occasional no-fare day.

 

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

I have already seen many changes and I am interested in improving it more.

Ward 2

 

Jean Marc Dugas

 

We need to improve the system for students and the elderly. We also need to extend the system all the way out to the periphery of Moncton.

 

Ward 2

 

Vernon Lillies

 

We need a citywide study to improve frequency and better organize routes. Provide a well-published number for information.

 

Ward 3

 

Brian Hicks

 

We added new routes, new buses, and new hours, including a new Sunday route. We have to keep doing the right things.

 

Ward 3

 

Daniel Bourgeois

 

Reserve lanes for buses on certain main arteries such as Mountain Road. We could have park and go shuttle buses at key collection points. We need also to do more promotion, maybe by giving a month free pass.

 

Ward 3

 

Earl Garland

 

This is a priority for me. We need to end one-hour bus trips. We need feedback from neighbourhood committees concerning their transportation priorities. We need to allow commuters to save on parking and ensure hospitals are adequately serviced.

 

Ward 3

 

Sue Murray

 

I would like to see free transit for seniors. More federal tax money should go toward public transit and we need to promote it more.

 

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

 

A study needs to be done to give the transit system a complete overhaul. Not only do we sometimes see buses with only one person on board passing by, which negates the whole point of public transit, but also the system is not arranged to be convenient for working families. We need better promotion and more convenient routes.

 

Ward 4

 

Louisa Barton Duguay

 

We need more accessibility and frequency. We should offer free passes for those with disabilities and provide subsidies to the poor.

 

Ward 4

 

Paul Pellerin

 

Systems need to be revamped to meet the needs of citizens. We need more routes, more destinations, and extended hours. Buses need to go to parks.

 

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Question 10

Ward

Candidate

10. What do you see as the key components of an energy conservation policy for the City of Moncton?

At large

Anya Trites

City workers should drive hybrids.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

Good planning could help. We should also implement a district energy system based on geothermal and solar sources. We need to create more public awareness. We need to get people to use more public transit. We should adopt LEEDS standards for new construction. (i.e. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - LEEDs standards)

At large

Pierre Boudreau

We have to set a good example at City Hall and turn everything off when we leave. We’ve already bought « Smart Cars ». Management is highly sensitive to ecology.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

We need to set goals to cut energy use in city buildings. We need to create a program that guides city workers on how to save energy.

Ward 1

Paulette Thériault

We could build a wind energy system, and use green energy in new constructions (such as solar panels, which could also be placed on the roof of Aberdeen Centre).

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

J’ai vu beaucoup de progrès dans les derniers 10 ans. Nous devrions générer de l’énergie avec l’ancien dépotoir. Nous pourrions aussi convertir les voitures à une source renouvelable. Les constructions futures devraient être « energy efficient. »

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

I would like the City to heat its buildings with solar thermal energy. It’s also possible that the old dump emits heat. We have to find local solutions with local young people.   

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Lighting, including street lighting, is not used effectively. In addition, a study should be done on whether buses are being used efficiently.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

We have smart cars that save energy and gas. We should also change the light bulbs. We need to be open to suggestions from the citizens, possibly in an online public forum.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

We need public participation on this, but here are some of my ideas. All city vehicles could be switched over to fuel-efficient hybrid models as they are replaced. All city buildings should use efficient light bulbs.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

Smart cars were a good idea. The policy on idling of vehicles was also a good idea. I do have a concern about employees stuck out in the cold with no place for shelter except their vehicle.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

Moncton must show leadership by example. We need to recycle and go green. We need to use public transit for city business. We need to look at what kind of fuel city vehicles are using. We need to monitor recycling and waste issues.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

The recent purchase by the city of smart cars was a good idea, but city employees need guidelines to reduce energy use and even conserve water in all of their activities. In addition, we should be working with outside agencies like Efficiency NB to help promote energy efficiency.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

Moncton needs to invest in geothermal and solar energy supplies.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

We need more buses, more bike routes, more green spaces and trees. Perhaps we could use solar panels on stoplights. Also the no idling law (for city vehicles) needs to be enforced.

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Question 11

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Question 12

Ward

Candidate

12. If elected, would you support a ban of cosmetic pesticides?

At large

Anya Trites

I would support it with a grandfathering clause for a couple of years.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

No, a ban on pesticides wouldn’t work; however, they should only be used as absolutely needed. In addition, the provincial government needs to be lobbied to pass appropriate legislation to control pesticide.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

No. I am against a ban at 100%. There already is a voluntary policy. We will get 5000 other posters.. The sum of 75000 $ has been spent on the education of the population.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

I am against pesticides. They not only kill bugs and birds, but also eventually kill us.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

I am against pesticides.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

I have already presented a resolution to Council to ban pesticides. I am in favour of eliminating the use of pesticides for aesthetic purposes.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Yes. Too many fields are treated with pesticides.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Yes. And this is one of the issues I would push up to the provincial level.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

Yes, but the province should step in and get pesticides off the store shelves rather than leaving it up to municipalities.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

Yes, but we will need to keep in mind that this is not primarily a municipal responsibility.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

I don’t support a ban on cosmetic pesticides, but I believe that people who use them should have access to information that allows them to use them correctly.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

We need to lead by example. I need to know more about the impact of pesticides, but would support a ban of their use on certain areas, such as playgrounds.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Yes. I don’t know why this hasn’t already been done. It is not a debatable subject.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

Yes. Pesticides should be banned.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

Yes, abolutely.

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Question 13

Ward

Candidate

13. If elected, would you support a ban on uranium exploration and mining in the Turtle Creek watershed and surrounding areas?

At large

Anya Trites

I am opposed to uranium mining there. We need to think of the future for our kids.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

I am opposed to uranium mining.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

Yes. I am opposed to that exploitation 100%

Ward 1

Graham Walker

I'm against uranium mining there.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

I'm against uranium.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

We need to ban it throughout the province.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

I'm against uranium.. I have a poster on my door.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Certainly. And this is one of the most important issues not only for Moncton but for the whole province.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

Yes.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

Yes, absolutely.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

Yes.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

Yes.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Yes. I have been on public record as opposing this for quite some time. Finally City Council is on our side. The Province is next.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

Yes.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

Yes, absolutely. And at the same time I would work together with other communities in Southeast NB so that we speak with one voice to the provincial government on this issue.

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Question 14

Ward

Candidate

14. What is your position on the replacement of the causeway with a bridge?

At large

Anya Trites

Yes for the bridge, but with appropriate precautions.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

It is really a provincial issue, but is a concern for the city infrastructure. It might be a bigger problem than we think.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

In 1990, the city voted for four lanes on the causeway. I was the only one who voted against it.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

I am not in favour of the causeway. It should never have been built. But now we need to take precautions with regard to the old dump.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

I'm working with the River Keepers.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

Yes for the  bridge.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Yes, it must be replaced.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

I am opposed to keeping the causeway and in favour of a bridge.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

Yes, but the money needs to come from the federal and provincial levels. The city doesn't have the money to do it.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

Replacing the causeway makes sense. However, we must consider the impact on the dump. Restoring the river will be a long process that will need to be monitored over the course of 20 years or more.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

The causeway should be replaced with a bridge. I am a fisherman. I also remember the boats, ships, and barges that used to come up the river.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

I would like to see the river returned to a river, but that will take a long time and we will need commitment and $ from all three levels of government.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

I am for it. I was at the environmental impact meeting. But there is a caveat. I believe it is part and parcel of an upgrade to our water treatment facilities, even though they are separate projects.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

Yes. I have been involved with the Riverkeepers.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

Opening the causeway is long overdue. There should never have been a dump near the river, let alone a causeway. I am disappointed that the provincial government has not provided the funds to fix it. As well, maybe we should be recovering methane gas from the dump.

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Question 15

Ward

Candidate

15. In order to promote and coordinate social development in the City of Moncton, are you prepared, if elected, to create a Human Development Council with strong citizen representation?

At large

Anya Trites

Yes, I would support such a Council. The city is out of touch with its citizens.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

There was such a committee set up in the past. It met when it was needed. Now there is a senior's committee and a youth committee, but social issues are primarily a provincial responsibility, so it is hard to say whether a permanent committee would be needed.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

A good idea. Mitton has already set up a senior committee and a youth committee.  But before taking a serious decision, consultations are in order.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

Yes, I would support such a Council. The more ideas we can get, the better.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

Absolutely. This is important.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

There are already committees for seniors and for youth. But I find this is also a good idea and an important one.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Yes, an excellent idea. There are many social problems that the councillors ignore. Let us speak to the people.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Yes. A Human Development Council would contribute to reviving community.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

It's something to look into. There is already a Seniors' Advisory Committee, a Public Safety Advisory Committee, and a Youth Advisory Committee.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

I'm not sure if this is the best mechanism but in principle I strongly support participatory democracy. We need to start analyzing how to get citizens more involved.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

I am not only for a Human Development Council, I also believe that neighbourhood committees need to be created.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

I'm willing to consider the idea but would need more information on how it would work.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Yes, emphatically. In fact, this was part of my platform in the recent byelection, to bring all community groups around the table to effect change.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

It's an interesting idea.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

I'm surprised we don't have one now. All councillors should talk to the citizens.

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Question 16

Ward

Candidate

16. Do you agree with a policy stating that all individuals and companies applying for a contract with the City of Moncton show proof that they pay a living wage of at least $10.00 to all their employees?   (An individual working full-time all year would need an hourly wage of $10 to remain above the poverty line.)

At large

Anya Trites

Yes, a living wage brings respect and pride.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

I don't believe that the Council has the legal authority to do this.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

I am not competent to answer this question.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

Yes, but I believe that $10 per hour is not enough.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

Yes at least.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

I am open to that but all councillors would need to be in favour. I am certainly open to study it.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Yes, but I'm against a surfeit of laws.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Absolutely. People need to be able to live comfortably and contribute to their community.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

The city can't pass a bylaw like that because it would be brought down by the province.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

I'm not sure of the legal implications of imposing wage rates on contractors, but maybe we can give them more points if they comply with a living wage policy.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

I am sympathetic to the idea of a $10 hourly wage, but am concerned about pushing any extra costs on to taxpayers.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

I would need to know more about the impact before taking a position.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

Yes. I even support raising the provincial minimum wage to $10.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

I support the idea, but don't know if it could be implemented.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

This is tricky because of competition laws. We can't tell bidders how much they will pay their employees. This is really a provincial matter that must be corrected through minimum wage legislation.

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Question 17

Ward

Candidate

17. If elected, are you prepared to implement a Pay Equity policy for all city and contractual employees?

At large

Anya Trites

Yes, for sure.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

I am 100% in favour.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

Yes certainly.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

I don’t really understand the issue but it seems a good idea.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

There was already a motion. Now a follow up committee must be set up.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

Yes, I am in favour of this.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

Yes.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

Certainly.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

Yes.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

Yes, but doubtless there will be legal implications and it will take 3 to 5 years.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

Yes. Man or woman, it doesn’t matter. They should all be paid equally.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

Before Pay Equity can be implemented a standard needs to be established and we need to define the different levels and positions. The limitation on implementing equal pay for equal value is that someone has to decide what work is of comparable value.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

I was shocked to discover that there was no official Pay Equity policy. One needs to be in place.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

Yes.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

Yes, I have three daughters and am all for pay equity. Work of equal value should be paid equally.

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Question 18

Ward

Candidate

18.  How would you encourage the building of more modest housing stock, integrated in different neighborhoods, so as to avoid high and low income ghettos?

At large

Anya Trites

I support co-op housing and subsidized housing.

At large

Kathryn Barnes

The city only has input to planning and zoning. Provision of modest housing stock is a provincial responsibility.

At large

Pierre Boudreau

I am  in favour of providing subsidized housing and integrating them in the community.

Ward 1

Graham Walker

We need to encourage modest housing while avoiding ghettos. We need to study other cities to see how they fix this problem.

Ward 1

Paulette Theriault

Houses built for the poor are often ugly, on small lots. So community gardens need to be part of any neighbourhood. We need to discourage rooming houses that are built just to make a profit.

Ward 1

Steven Boyce

I am open to all solutions. The dilemma is that the three cities must work together. We could, for example, form a committee to lobby the provincial and federal governments.

Ward 2

Jean Marc Dugas

We need to construct housing that is affordable to students and the young; people must not be isolated from one another.

Ward 2

Vernon Lillies

I believe that housing cooperatives are an option not sufficiently explored by the city.

Ward 3

Brian Hicks

This is really a federal and provincial issue. The city’s options in this regard are pretty much limited to zoning and we can’t determine what developers will do once they buy the land to build on it.

Ward 3

Daniel Bourgeois

I certainly support encouraging developers to include houses and apartments that are subsidized by the provincial government. I am also in favour of providing empty lots and condemned buildings to charitable organizations such as Habitat for Humanity that will use the space to build low-cost housing.

Ward 3

Earl Garland

The implied solution here sounds too simple. Are we going to force developers to use land in ways that they may not agree with? Might they not pull out of a project when they realize that it isn’t going to be as profitable as they had hoped? I strongly support the building of homes by local charities for low income citizens, but that does not seem to be the solution being considered here.

Ward 3

Sue Murray

I don't know the answer. The whole community needs to show an interest and not just Council alone. Some of the problems with low income housing are that the property must be properly maintained and integration may push down the property value of the adjacent higher valued housing.

Ward 4

Dave Hackett

We need to make sure that the people who need it are aware of the programs that exist.

Ward 4

Louisa Barton Duguay

I would certainly encourage integration.

Ward 4

Paul Pellerin

I build community and find the funds needed to build a house for those who need it. I believe in hand-ups; not hand-downs. I would be a voice for Habitat for Humanity.

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changed May 8, 2008